Diamond rebounds and offers a gem By: Melissa Martin Updated: September 15 at 02:55 AM CDT The end of summer has not been kind to Neil Diamond. Only two weeks ago, the Brooklyn-born pop icon showed up to a show in Columbus, Ohio, with a raspy voice, and was forced to offer refunds when fans protested. Then he cancelled a couple of tour dates to recover from a throat infection. But judging from Diamond's Sunday-night showcase at the MTS Centre, those recent troubles are far behind him. The star, who has been rehearsing in Winnipeg for a few days, showed up onstage with a hale voice and a hearty attitude. Kicking off his set a...

THE MUSIC OF LIFE Diane ? Reader Submitted ? September 11, 2008 When my dad passed away, the family cleared his possessions from the nursing home. During his stay, mom had made sure his room was filled with the things he loved. A photograph of the cabin up north adorned the wall. Pictures of the grandchildren stood on his shelf. An aquarium with frogs and crickets sat near his bed to bring the song of the woods into his room. And his candy stash was hidden in his bottom drawer to share with visitors. Each of us brought home mementos from dad's room. My brother and his children made a new home for the frogs, the picture of the cabin fo...

The Real Neil? Diamond can hold his own against Young any day By DAVID SCHMEICHEL What with all the recent talk about prodigal son Neil Young's impending homecoming, it's easy to overlook the fact that another celebrated Neil is also on his way. That would be Neil Diamond, of course -- the raspy, rhinestoned, self-described "Jewish Elvis" who'll bring soccer moms to their knees when he hits MTS Centre this Sunday. But wait! -- you're probably thinking -- Isn't Neil Diamond, with his schmaltzy ballads and bedazzled collars, like, totally lame? Whereas Neil Young -- with his street-person sideburns and folksy fundraisers -- i...

Chili Peppers probably have the best shot By Ken Barnes USA TODAY The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame is proud to induct England's loudest band, Spinal Tap ... OK, that's not a likely scenario, even if the metafictional metal band is finally eligible. But when the nominating committee for the Rock Hall sits down today in New York to hash out nominees, the first step in the process that will elect the class of 2009, it will be choosing from a relatively unappetizing menu of first-time prospects. The closest thing to the Madonnas, R.E.M.s, Van Halens and U2s that have starred at recent inductions is probably the Red Hot Chili Peppers...

Kudos to Neil Diamond for a first-class apology! By Lauren | September 4, 2008 My hat goes off to singer Neil Diamond, whose ''silk and sandpaper'' voice has contributed so many hits to popular music. Unfortunately, even rock stars get sick now and then, and Diamond recently suffered a bout of laryngitis that left fans in Ohio disappointed after one of his concerts. Diamond not only publicly apologized, he did something that's almost unprecedented in the music industry … he gave his audience their money back. Personally, I was impressed. Diamond literally put his money where his mouth was, refusing to charge fans for what he co...

Q&A with Neil Diamond Neil Diamond (Paul Kane/Getty Images) 08/29/2008 Neil Diamond's hits go back to the '60s, but "Home Before Dark," released in May, is his first record to debut at No. 1. Q. What's it like to have an album debut at No. 1 after all these years? A. I didn't think it was my first No. 1. I don't know what the opposite of a state of denial is, but I thought for sure I had a No. 1 album somewhere along the way. I thought "Hot August Night" (1972) was No. 1, but then I was told it only went to No. 2, so I was crestfallen. Q. How would you describe the new tour? A. I'm trying to cover a lifetime of...

The singer Neil Diamond may have set a new trend in the music world by giving an unprecedented refund to his fans after performing with a raspy voice. By Andrew Pierce Last Updated: 3:39AM BST 29 Aug 2008 Neil Diamond issued a statement on his web site apologising for the under-par performance Photo: GETTY Diamond, 67, who had a gravelly voice even in his salad days, was diagnosed with acute laryngitis after Monday's show in Columbus, Ohio in front of an 11,000 strong audience. The singer songwriter, who has had a remarkable resurgence this year with his first number one album, issued a statement on his web site apologisin...

Following a poor performance at a concert in Columbus, Ohio, singer Neil Diamond felt it necessary to say sorry to his fans. But instead of just issuing an apology (which he did) and promising to perform better his next time through Ohio (which he said he will), Diamond will instead refund the tickets of every single person who attended the August 25th concert at the Value City Arena. To break it down numerically, that's 11,000 tickets that the Solitary Man will refund. Diamond is in the thick of a U.S. tour, and during the last few shows, the singer had been suffering from acute laryngitis. He still made it to the Columbus stage, but f...

A rapsy Neil Diamond gives refunds to concert-goers By Mary Kate Varnau on August 28, 2008 11:12 AM Neil Diamond was diagnosed with laryngitis after a recent concert at Ohio State University, where he reportedly ''sounded raspy.'' Many fans walked out during the event, which took place on Monday, demanding refunds and flooding the veteran singer-songwriter's inbox with grievances. A spokeswoman came forward today, offering reimbursement to concert-goers who submit their requests before Sept. 5. Diamond also posted an apology on his website: ''Please give me a few days to figure out a way to make it up to you. I haven't let you d...

Neil Diamond Offering Concert Refunds Posted by Mitch Michaels on 08.27.2008 Neil feels he wasn't up to par... Disappointed Neil Diamond fans will get a refund after attending a concert at Ohio State University in which the 67-year-old singer's voice sounded raspy. Some fans left the Monday concert early and others said Diamond completed the concert without mentioning anything to the audience about his voice. A statement from Diamond on Tuesday says a doctor has diagnosed acute laryngitis. Diamond spokeswoman Eve Samuels says the singer is offering a refund to those who place a request before September 5th. "I haven'...

Ask folks the last time Neil Diamond played Green Bay, and they'll tell you they don't think he ever has. Then again, most people don't have a memory like Diamond. During a recent conference-call interview, the 67-year-old singer/songwriter set the record straight on whether or not his sold-out show Wednesday at the Resch Center will be historic for the local music scene. Even a press release from the promoter announcing the concert back in April billed it as "his first-ever Green Bay performance." "Actually, it's not. I remember playing Green Bay in the late '60s, only because everyone knew of the Packers," Diamond says. "I was...

Joan Anderman went to ye old ballyard last night to check out Neil Diamond and fired this review over to "Sound Effects": Neil Diamond, the old-fashioned showman, and Neil Diamond, the contemplative songwriter, teamed up over the weekend at Fenway Park for a concert that split the difference between the two. Backed by his longtime band -- a 15-piece behemoth brimming with horns and harmony singers, congas and keyboards -- Diamond’s concert was brassy, schmaltzy, and dated. It was also searching and rootsy and deep, and while the juxtapositions were sometimes striking, Diamond sold the whole package with a sense of r...

This is Neil Diamond telling you how it is at age 67: ''I'm not reaching out for anybody but the audience that wants to listen. That's all. I'm not doing anything logical. I'm not pre-planning anything. Maybe I would have had a better career if I had and thought it out, but it was all based on how well I could write the songs, and how good the songs would be, and how the audience took it to their hearts, and it's still that way - exactly that way.'' And that's the long and the short of it - as best a pop star who's been in the game for more than four decades can attest, speaking to an international collection of fawning reporters duri...

Neil Diamond's heart may belong to the Yankees, but last night he loaned his soul to Fenway Park. It wasn't exactly a ''Hot August Night.'' But things have changed in the 36 years since Diamond released that landmark live recording: His hair's more under control, his shirts remain buttoned, the collars are unobtrusive and, perhaps most important, his oft-parodied dramatic performances are now tempered with smart restraint. In front of some 37,000 fans jamming the beloved ballpark, Diamond took Boston on a two-hour tour of his catalogue, touching old, touching new, touching me, touching you. In fact, good sport that he is, the Red ...

Where it began? Opening day at Fenway Park. Neil Diamond - via videotape - sang ''Sweet Caroline'' to the Red Sox crowd and announced he'd be the star of the ballpark's big 2008 rock concert. Diamond was a, um, jewel of a pick to play Fenway. Sure the crooner's a grade A cornball, but he's got a score of Top 40 hits everybody loves (either earnestly or ironically), an armoire full of glittery shirts that fit his heavy-on-histrionics live persona and that sweet ''Sweet Caroline'' connection. But lately, under the influence of producer du jour Rick Rubin, the 67-year-old Diamond has traded in his outlandishly overwrought torch s...

ALBANY — It was a "Hot August Night" at the Times Union Center on Wednesday. Superstar Neil Diamond brought his band to the arena for a superstar show that found him reprising many of the hits found on his landmark 1972 live album, "Hot August Night," as well as other chart-toppers and fan favorites from throughout his long career. Like fellow star Willie Nelson, Diamond is not one to let his art get in the way of his commerce, so he offered only a few songs from his latest album, "Home Before Dark." That seemed a little odd, considering that the record, like 2005's "12 Songs" (from which he drew the inspiring "Man of God" and...

Diamond songs sung true Impersonator may even top the real thing for Vegas crowds Tiffany Brown Jay White performs as Neil Diamond on Sunday at Le Bistro Theatre at the Riviera, where he has been impersonating the entertainer for nearly 10 years. Diamond has said he isn't considering an ongoing Vegas show and left the city off his tour schedule, so this former insurance salesman is local fans' go-to guy. By Joe Brown Tue, Aug 19, 2008 (2 a.m.) If You Go What: Jay White as Neil Diamond When: 7 p.m. Sunday through Thursday Where: Le Bistro Theatre at the Riviera Admission: $68.90; 794-9433, www.rivierahotel.com Sun...

ROUGH DIAMONDAugust 19, 2008 -- NEIL Diamond spewing obscenities and shooting heroin? It nearly happened. In the upcoming bio, "He Is . . . I Say," David Wild reveals the famed singer-songwriter wanted to shed his squeaky-clean image by portraying Lenny Bruce in the 1974 flick "Lenny" and even did a successful screen test. "In just a few seconds, he somehow transformed himself into a believable dirty-mouthed, Constitution-defending comedian," writes Wild. But the part went to Dustin Hoffman, who got an Oscar nomination. Diamond's acting career turned to toast after his woeful turn as "The Jazz Singer" six years later.

Name the best crowd participation concert song Aug 19, 2008, 09:00 AM | by Mandi Bierly Categories: Dig it Out!, Music, On the Scene, PopWatch Dance Party I went to see Neil Diamond at Madison Square Garden Friday night, and it could be the most fun I've ever had at a concert. Though the squeals I let out at the start of "I Am... I Said" and "Love on the Rocks" were involuntary, I could've probably controlled myself during "Sweet Caroline" but didn't. The entire arena was on its feet, singing along ("So good! So good! So good!") and marveling at the cojones Diamond has to do that song mid-show. Even if you think "Sweet Caroline" is ...

Music Review: Diamond delivers a gem of a concert Tuesday, August 19, 2008 By Rosa Colucci, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette John Heller/Post-GazetteNeil Diamond performs last night at Mellon Arena.13,000 "Diamond-heads" can't be wrong. Neil Diamond's hard core fan base showed up at Mellon Arena last night to hear the iconic singer-songwriter deliver a solid two-hour set of some of the most popular tunes ever penned. Diamond kicked the night off barreling through "Holly Holy," "Beautiful Noise" and "Street Life" with such professional polish and showmanship you forgot that this guy started his career as a Tin-Pan Alley songwriter and is pu...

Neil Diamond concert hits nostalgic note with fans By Regis Behe TRIBUNE-REVIEW Tuesday, August 19, 2008 Buzz up! Neil Diamond is one of those hallowed performers who never seems to age. At the Mellon Arena Monday night, he put on a concert awash in nostalgia; the fans who came to hear the hits got them, from "I Am ... I Said" to "Sweet Caroline." What's surprising is that this was not a show that belongs in a time capsule. At 67, Diamond is trim, energetic and charismatic. He doesn't quite have the range he once did, but that doesn't matter. The man knows how to sell a song, and nowhere was that more apparent on "Love on th...

This time it's not a recording Neil Diamond will at last sing 'Sweet Caroline' at Fenway this week. Not to mention songs from his - surprise - recent No. 1 album. By Joan Anderman Globe Staff / August 17, 2008 There's something almost mystical about the prospect of Neil Diamond singing "Sweet Caroline" in the flesh at Fenway Park next Saturday. The song, which blasts from the speakers at every home game, has become the team's unofficial anthem and more: a rousing eighth-inning singalong-turned-musical totem whose propitious properties remain a mystery - even to the songwriter who the folks at Fenway have been trying to lure to ...

Music Preview: 50 years going, Neil Diamond finds the top of the charts Thursday, August 14, 2008 By Scott Mervis, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Richard Drew/Associated PressSinger Neil Diamond will bring his "Home Before Dark" tour to Mellon Arena Monday night.In the movie "What About Bob?" Bill Murray's wacky character reduces the world's population to a simple formula: "Those who like Neil Diamond, and those who don't." Well, like him or not, he's one of the most successful recording artists of all time: Music Preview: 50 years going, Neil Diamond finds the top of the charts Thursday, August 14, 2008 By Scott Mervis, Pittsburgh Pos...

Glittery Diamond Charms Fans (and a Convert) With Greatest Hits Review by Mary Romano Aug. 14 (Bloomberg) -- Looking rugged and fit in a black suit and glittery embroidered shirt, Neil Diamond belted out ''America'' as 12,860 mostly middle-aged fans at New York's Madison Square Garden danced and sang along like a backup choir. To my amazement, I was one of those fans at Diamond's sizzling two-hour show on Tuesday night. When I was growing up in nearby Brooklyn in the 1970s, my Diamond-loving father played the pop singer's kitschy songs so often that my two siblings and I -- who preferred Fleetwood Mac, the Eagles and the Be...

Neil Diamond talks about his tour, No. 1 album Neil Diamond returns to Albany buoyed by his first No. 1 album By GREG HAYMES, Staff writer First published: Thursday, August 14, 2008 Neil Diamond has been cranking out hit after hit since "Cherry, Cherry" first landed in the Top 10 back in 1966. That's more than four decades on the charts. And he's still breaking new ground. His latest album, "Home Before Dark," was produced by the Midas-touched Rick Rubin, who was also at the helm for Diamond's 2005 album, "12 Songs," which launched something of a comeback for the veteran singer-songwriter. On both albums, Diamond offe...

Neil Diamond stays the course By Regis Behe TRIBUNE-REVIEW Thursday, August 14, 2008 Buzz up! Neil Diamond seems to be immune to the trends of the music business. Rock 'n' roll was in its infancy when he had his first hits, "Solitary Man" and "Cherry, Cherry." In the '70s, when the Eagles, Jackson Browne and other sensitive souls emerged, when disco balls glittered their brightest, Diamond stayed the course with "Sweet Caroline" and "Song Sung Blue." When New Wave reared its multicolored head in the early '80s, Diamond responded with the album "America" and the Top 10 singles "Love on the Rocks," "Hello Again" and the ti...

Confessions of a Practical Blonde: Audible Sensation By Sharon Leary - August 13, 2008 iBerkshires Columnist Sharon Leary Certain senses trigger memories and sensations. The taste of freshly picked butter-and-sugar corn transports you to a fun summer day, the sight of a beautiful sunset may take you back to a passionate moment or the feel of clean cotton sheets may remind you of a lazy summer afternoon nap. Of course, our senses can also trigger bad memories; the taste of spinach always brings me back to being a preteen and sitting at the table till my plate was clean. The sense of hearing has had a profound effect on my...

BY ALANE CALLANDER FOR THE STAFFORD COUNTY SUN Published: August 13, 2008 ''The American Popular Song goes on and on…'' Neil Diamond’s lyrics proclaim. Yes it does. The American popular song industry is huge. Some of the music is great; some is hardly music at all. Personal taste comes into play, and marketing is a part of that. What you hear on the radio impacts what you grow to appreciate. If that cool deejay says a new release is dynamic, then you may actually believe it. If it's hip to like it, then why not embrace it? I just came back from one of those awesome pop concerts in Washington, D. C., this one put on by Neil Dia...

Neil Diamond facts Wednesday, August 13, 2008 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Christof Stache/Associated PressNeil Diamond performs in Munich, Germany, in May. * Neil Leslie Diamond was born Jan. 24, 1941, in Brooklyn, N.Y., to Rose and Akeeba (Kieve) Diamond, a dry-goods merchant. * He was turned on to music when Pete Seeger played at his summer camp. * He received his first guitar as a birthday present in 1957. * He attended New York University (pre-med) on a fencing scholarship. * He did his first recording as the duo Neil and Jack with Jack Packer in 1960. * He was hired as a songwriter for Sunbeam Music in Tin Pan Alley i...

King of Diamonds By Joe Brown · August 12, 2008 · 1:16 PM Neil Diamond just started his 37-city U.S. tour -- tonight he begins a four-night stand at Madison Square Garden. Hey Neil, you forgot to pencil in a Vegas stop! In a recent interview, Diamond, 67, said he isn't considering a Vegas residency like fellow sexagenarian icons Bette Midler, Cher, Elton John and Barry Manilow, all of whom remain big concert draws. "I feel it's like one of my obligations as an artist to come to people's hometowns and play my music for them," Diamond told the Detroit Free Press. This is a major moment in Diamond's career -- he's been uncool...

That music in the air Tuesday evening could be coming from a couple of nice Jewish boys who happen to have arrived in town at the same time: Neil Diamond, at Madison Square Garden, and Bob Dylan, at Prospect Park in Brooklyn. Sobering as it sounds, these two have together logged close to a hundred years in popular music, which confirms the obvious: These are two of the most remarkable careers of modern times. In some ways, it's been the same career. They both write songs and sing songs, and if you ask them what they do, they'll almost certainly describe it as essentially that. But everything they do, professionally and maybe pe...

NEIL Diamond has a polarizing effect on people. You either love or hate him, but lately there seems to be lots o' love for this 67-year-old American treasure. This past spring when he conducted a master class on "American Idol," the hit talent show had one of its highest-rated episodes ever. And a couple of weeks later, when Diamond dropped his new "Home Before Dark," the record debuted at the top of the charts. It was his first No. 1 record debut in a career featuring more than two dozen albums that have sold a collective 125 million copies. It's no surprise Diamond is hot these days. Anyone who's ever been to one of his concerts k...